Category Archives: Periodical

Issue no. 104 (Winter 2014)

Our new issue follows the path we have set for ourselves: the studies included reflect in detail on the transformations of the capitalist world-system, its upheavals, and the perspectives of its disintegration. Within the pores of capitalism new opportunities also arise for initiatives of collective self-management, some of which are reviewed in the current issue. In our historical studies the ‘rich’ history of Hungarian anti-Semitism is analyzed along with the current government’s policy of the systematic renaming of Budapest’s public spaces, as part of its effort to relegitimise the Horthy régime of the interwar era. We also present a theoretical analysis and critique of the newly fashionable liberal terminology, which describes the current conjuncture with the concept of a ‘mafia-state’.

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Issue 103 (Autumn 2014)

103boritoThe contents of this issue – not for the first time in the journal’s history – reflect upon the contradictions and tendencies of the changing world order of our time, building upon the experiences of the last 25 years. In the last quarter of a century wars and genocides – often waged under the banner of democracy – have remained a part of the life of many nations around the world. Peripheries and semi-peripheries have suffered the most under the different processes of change as the very structures and hierarchies of their societies reflect their subordination to the centers of the world-system. Even most movements attempting to decouple and gain more elbow-room are more often than not misguided extensions of this developmental trend.

We look back at the fate of left-wing, anti-capitalist intellectual initiatives by dissidents in the era of state socialism, with the benefit of hindsight we have today. Should we reconcile ourselves to hopelessness?

We pay tribute to our friend and colleague, the economist András Vígvári, who died recently.

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István Mészáros: Reflections on the New International

Also Peter Gowan wrote that the incorporation of East Europe into the capitalist world system is highly similar to imperialism. The starting point of the study of István Mészáros is1 structural crisis of the system of capitalist production specifically falls into military interventions, in which globalized capital (which disposes the strongest positions in the so called postmodern countries) turns against modern and pre-modern regions 

“in order to perpetuate their so-called »liberal imperialisms and the total domination of the militarily less powerful countries by unleashing »death and destructions.”

 

According to the study, despite former experiences there are positive preconditions nowadays to organize a more combative International.

Eszmélet periodical, No. 101 (Spring 2014)

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Learning to Participate: The MST Experience in Brazil

Maybe the Landless Workers' Movement (MST) of Brazil has one of the hugest social base and most radical leftist program in Latin America. It constitutes an unavoidable reference for all contemporary leftist peasant movements both in Latin America and in the other continents as well. Its legendary combative land occupations and its highly organized and conscious autonomist system of popular education in the spirit of Paulo Freire designate the MST to be the most massive and theoretically most advanced bloc of the Via Campesina. The author, a Brazilian sociologist, presents us a relatively detailed account of the main practices of the movement, of its theoretical starting points and also its practical results.

Twenty-First-Century Land Grabs Accumulation by Agricultural Dispossession

The main incentive for the multiform land grabs is the utilitarian, profit-oriented use of land. Among the leitmotivs of the present wave of land grabs, especially on the global South, one could find the increasing ecological problems, and the speculation for the likely future boom of food prices. The centralization of land control and the food production that is dominated by profit based industrialized factory farms is hamstringing agrarian small producers and is aggravating the population of slums; from the other hand it is incompatible with the needs of an ecologically sustainable agriculture and the food sovereignty of the peoples.